Ukraine tourism packages are the ideal approach to ensure that visitors to the country get to see all of the country’s key sights and attractions. This allows you to enjoy in both the history and culture of the locals as well as the breathtaking surroundings.

Ukraine is an interesting vacation destination because of its natural beauty, which allows you to forget about your cares and get away from the problems of city life. Ukraine, regardless of your age, will provide you with some form of attraction to keep your attention.

Since 32,000 BC, people have lived on the modern-day territory of Ukraine. The area was a major center of East Slavic culture during the Middle Ages, with the loose tribal federation Kievan Rus’ establishing the foundation of Ukrainian identity.

The territorial unity of the area was contested, divided, and ruled by a variety of powers, including the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire, and the Tsardom of Russia, following its fragmentation into several principalities in the 13th century and the devastation caused by the Mongol invasion.

During the 17th and 18th centuries, a Cossack Hetmanate arose and prospered, but its territory was finally divided between Poland and the Russian Empire. Following the Russian Revolution, a Ukrainian national movement for self-determination arose, and on June 23, 1917, the internationally recognized Ukrainian People’s Republic was established. Following the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, Ukraine regained its independence.

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Ukraine declared itself a neutral state after gaining independence, forming a limited military relationship with Russia and other CIS countries while also forming a partnership with NATO in 1994.

After President Viktor Yanukovych’s government decided to suspend the Ukraine–European Union Association Agreement in order to pursue closer economic ties with Russia, the Euromaidan began a months-long wave of demonstrations and protests, which later escalated into the Revolution of Dignity, which led to Yanukovych’s overthrow and the formation of a new government.

These actions formed the stage for Russia’s annexation of Crimea in March 2014 and the start of the Donbas War in April 2014. Ukraine applied to the European Union for the economic component of the Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area on January 1, 2016.

Ukraine is a developing country with a Human Development Index ranking of 74th. It is Europe’s poorest country, with an extremely high poverty rate and a high level of corruption. Ukraine, on the other hand, is one of the world’s largest grain exporters due to its huge rich farmlands. After Russia and France, it also has Europe’s third-largest military.

Ukraine is a unitary republic with a semi-presidential government in which the legislative, executive, and judicial institutions have separate powers. The United Nations, the Council of Europe, the OSCE, the GUAM organization, the Association Trio, and the Lublin Triangle are all members of the country.

In commemoration of the 1919 union of the Ukrainian People’s Republic and the West Ukrainian National Republic, about 300,000 Ukrainians formed a human chain between Kyiv and Lviv on January 21, 1990. Citizens took to the streets and highways in support of togetherness, making live chains by holding hands.

The Declaration of State Sovereignty of Ukraine was adopted by the new parliament on July 16, 1990. The ideals of self-determination, democracy, independence, and the primacy of Ukrainian law over Soviet law were established. The Russian SFSR parliament had adopted a similar declaration a month before.

This sparked a period of conflict with the Soviet Union’s central authority. The Revolution on Granite took place in Ukraine from October 2 to 17, 1990, with the primary goal of delaying the signing of a new USSR union treaty. The students’ requests were met when the Verkhovna Rada passed a resolution signing their implementation.

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In August 1991, a group of Soviet Communist leaders launched a coup to depose Mikhail Gorbachev and reclaim power for the Communist party. After it failed, the Ukrainian parliament adopted the Act of Independence on August 24, 1991. On December 1, 1991, a referendum and the first presidential elections were held.

More over 90% of the electorate voted in support of the Act of Independence, and Leonid Kravchuk, the leader of the parliament, was elected as Ukraine’s first President. The leaders of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine formally dissolved the Soviet Union and formed the Commonwealth of Independent States at a conference in Brest, Belarus on December 8, followed by the Alma Ata meeting on December 21. (CIS).

The Supreme Council of the USSR’s Council of Republics adapted the declaration “In Regards to the Creation of the Commonwealth of Independent States” on December 26, 1991, de jure dissolving the Soviet Union and lowering the Soviet flag over the Kremlin. Ukraine’s Verkhovna Rada did not confirm the accession, hence Ukraine has never been a member of the Commonwealth of Independent States.

In comparison to the rest of the Soviet Union, Ukraine was previously thought to have favorable economic conditions. However, the country’s economic recession was more severe than that of any of the other former Soviet republics. Between 1991 and 1999, Ukraine lost 60 percent of its GDP and saw five-digit inflation rates. Ukrainians protested and staged strikes in response to their dissatisfaction with the country’s economic difficulties as well as the high levels of crime and corruption.

By the end of the 1990s, the Ukrainian economy had stabilized. In 1996, a new currency, the hryvnia, was introduced. After 2000, the country experienced consistent real economic growth of around 7% each year. In 1996, under the second President Leonid Kuchma, Ukraine adopted a new Constitution that established the country into a semi-presidential republic with a stable political structure.

Opponents, on the other hand, accused Kuchma of corruption, election fraud, suppressing free expression, and concentrating too much power in his office. In exchange for different assurances, Ukraine also pursued full nuclear disarmament, giving up the world’s third largest nuclear weapons stockpile and dismantling or removing all strategic bombers from its territory.

Ukraine is a vast country in Eastern Europe that is primarily located in the East European Plain. After Russia, it is Europe’s second-largest country. It has a coastline of 2,782 kilometers and an area of 603,628 square kilometers (233,062 square miles) (1,729 mi). It is located between 44° and 53° north latitude and 22° and 41° east longitude.

Ukraine’s geography is dominated by rich plains (or steppes) and plateaus, which are cut through by rivers like the Dnieper (Dnipro), Seversky Donets, Dniester, and Southern Bug as they flow south into the Black Sea and the smaller Sea of Azov. The Danube delta defines the border with Romania to the southwest.

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From the mountains to the lowlands, Ukraine’s many regions offer a broad range of geographical features. The Carpathian Mountains in the west, where the highest peak is the Hora Hoverla at 2,061 meters (6,762 feet), and the Crimean Mountains in Crimea, in the extreme south along the shore, are the only mountains in the country.

The Volyn-Podillia Upland (in the west) and the Near-Dnipro Upland (in the east) are two of Ukraine’s highland regions (on the right bank of Dnieper).

The border with the Russian Federation goes across the south-western spurs of the Central Russian Upland to the east. The Donets Ridge and the Near Azov Upland are found near the Sea of Azov. Snowmelt from the mountains feeds the rivers, and natural height variations create abrupt reductions in elevation, resulting in waterfalls.

Iron ore, coal, manganese, natural gas, oil, salt, sulphur, graphite, titanium, magnesium, kaolin, nickel, mercury, lumber, and an abundance of fertile land are all important natural resources in Ukraine.

Despite this, the country has a number of serious environmental concerns, including insufficient drinkable water supplies, air and water pollution, and deforestation, as well as radiation damage in the north-east from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in 1986. In Ukraine, toxic household trash recycling is still in its infancy.

With the exception of Crimea’s southern shore, which has a subtropical climate, Ukraine has a largely temperate climate. The climate is influenced by the Atlantic Ocean’s moderately warm, humid air. Temperatures in the north range from 5.5–7 °C (41.9–44.6 °F) to 11–13 °C (51.8–55.4 °F) in the south.

The distribution of precipitation is asymmetric. The west and north have the highest levels, while the east and southeast have the lowest. Western Ukraine, particularly the Carpathian Mountains, receives over 1,200 millimetres (47.2 in) of annual precipitation, whilst Crimea and the Black Sea coast receive around 400 millimetres (15.7 in).

Central European mixed forests, Crimean Submediterranean forest complex, East European forest steppe, Pannonian mixed forests, Carpathian montane conifer forests, and Pontic steppe are the six terrestrial ecoregions found in Ukraine. Animals, fungi, microbes, and plants from all over the world call Ukraine home.

Ukraine is divided into two zoological regions. One of these places, located in western Ukraine, is made up of European borderlands, where species typical of mixed forests survive, while the other is in eastern Ukraine, where steppe-dwelling species thrive. Lynxes, wolves, wild boar, and martens, as well as many other related species, are prevalent in the country’s forested areas.

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This is especially true in the Carpathian Mountains, which are home to a variety of predatory species, as well as a population of brown bears. Beavers, otters, and mink live in the home of Ukraine’s lakes and rivers, while carp, bream, and catfish are the most prevalent fish species found in the waterways. Rodents such as hamsters and gophers can be found in considerable numbers in the country’s central and eastern regions.

More than 6,600 fungi species have been recorded in Ukraine (including lichen-forming species), but this number is far from full. Given the widely held belief that only around 7% of all fungi have been identified so far, the true total number of fungal species found in Ukraine, including species not yet recorded, is likely to be far higher.

Although the amount of available species is currently limited, a preliminary attempt has been made to estimate the number of endemic fungal species in Ukraine, with 2,217 provisionally identified.

Ukraine has a lower-middle-income economy, ranking 55th in nominal GDP and 40th in terms of purchasing power parity. It is one of the largest grain exporters in the world. Ukraine, on the other hand, continues to be one of Europe’s poorest and most corrupt countries. Ukraine’s GDP per capita is $14,146 PPP, according to the IMF.

In 2021, the average nominal monthly salary in Ukraine reached a new high of $14,282 (or $525). Ukraine’s median adult worth was $40 in 2018, making it one of the world’s lowest countries. In 2019, approximately 1.1 percent of Ukrainians lived below the poverty level. In 2019, Ukraine’s unemployment rate was 4.5 percent.

In 2019, the middle class categorized 5–15 percent of the Ukrainian population. Ukraine’s government debt is approximately 52 percent of its nominal GDP as of September 2020.

Ukraine manufactures practically all types of vehicles and spacecraft. Many countries have exported Antonov airplanes and KrAZ vehicles. The European Union and the Commonwealth of Independent States account for the majority of Ukrainian exports. Ukraine’s own space agency, the State Space Agency of Ukraine, has maintained since the country’s independence (SSAU).

Ukraine has been a key player in scientific space exploration and remote sensing missions. Ukraine launched six self-built satellites and 101 launch vehicles between 1991 and 2007, and it continues to develop spacecraft.

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Ukraine is self-sufficient in natural gas and petroleum production and processing. However, Ukraine imports the country of its energy, and 80 percent of its natural gas is imported, primarily from Russia. According to the World Tourism Organization, Ukraine ranked 8th in Europe for the number of tourists arriving in 2007.

There are many tourist attractions in Ukraine, including mountain ranges suitable for skiing, hiking, and fishing; the Black Sea coastline as a popular summer destination; nature reserves of various ecosystems; churches, castle ruins, and other architectural and park landmarks; and a variety of outdoor activity points. Kyiv, Lviv, Odessa, and Kamyanets-Podilskyi are the main tourist destinations in Ukraine, each with a wealth of historical treasures and a robust hospitality infrastructure.

Tourism used to be the mainstay of Crimea’s economy, but since Russia’s annexation in 2014, tourist numbers have plummeted. The Seven Wonders of Ukraine and the Seven Natural Wonders of Ukraine are a selection of Ukraine’s most notable sites chosen by the general people via an Internet vote.

Orthodox Christianity, the country’s primary religion, has a strong influence on Ukrainian customs. In comparison to the West, gender roles are more traditional, and grandparents have a larger part in raising children. Ukraine’s culture has been influenced by both its eastern and western neighbors, as evidenced by its architecture, music, and art.

The Soviet era had a significant impact on Ukrainian art and literature. When he made the order “On the Reconstruction of Literary and Art Organizations” in 1932, Stalin established socialist realism as official policy in the Soviet Union. This hindered creativity to a considerable extent. During the 1980s glasnost (openness) was introduced and Soviet artists and authors again became free to express themselves as they chose.

The Easter egg, also known as pysanky, has a long tradition in Ukraine. These eggs had a design made on them with wax, and then the dye was applied to give them their pleasing colors; the dye did not alter the wax-coated areas of the egg. The wax was removed once the entire egg had been coloured, leaving only the colorful design.

This tradition dates back thousands of years, even before Christianity arrived in Ukraine. The museum of Pysanka was established in the city of Kolomyia, amid the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains, in 2000, and was nominated as a monument of modern Ukraine in 2007, as part of the Seven Wonders of Ukraine action.

Ukraine has a lower-middle-income economy, ranking 55th in nominal GDP and 40th in terms of purchasing power parity. It is one of the largest grain exporters in the world. Ukraine, on the other hand, continues to be one of Europe’s poorest and most corrupt countries. Ukraine’s GDP per capita is $14,146 PPP, according to the IMF.

In 2021, the average nominal monthly salary in Ukraine reached a new high of $14,282 (or $525). Ukraine’s median adult worth was $40 in 2018, making it one of the world’s lowest countries.

In 2019, approximately 1.1 percent of Ukrainians lived below the poverty level. In 2019, Ukraine’s unemployment rate was 4.5 percent. In 2019, the middle class categorized 5–15 percent of the Ukrainian population. Ukraine’s government debt is approximately 52 percent of its nominal GDP as of September 2020.

Ukraine manufactures practically all types of vehicles and spacecraft. Many countries have exported Antonov airplanes and KrAZ vehicles. The European Union and the Commonwealth of Independent States account for the majority of Ukrainian exports. Ukraine’s own space agency, the State Space Agency of Ukraine, has maintained since the country’s independence (SSAU).

Ukraine has been a key player in scientific space exploration and remote sensing missions. Ukraine launched six self-built satellites and 101 launch vehicles between 1991 and 2007, and it continues to develop spacecraft.

Ukraine is self-sufficient in natural gas and petroleum production and processing. However, Ukraine imports the country of its energy, and 80 percent of its natural gas is imported, primarily from Russia.

The total length of paved roads in Ukraine is 164,732 kilometers (102,360 mi). Major routes, denoted by the letter ‘M’ for ‘International,’ run across the country, connecting all of Ukraine’s major cities and providing cross-border links to the country’s neighbors.

In Ukraine, there are just two actual motorway standard highways: a 175-kilometer (109-mile) stretch from Kharkiv to Dnipro and a segment of the M03 that runs 18 kilometers (11 miles) from Kyiv to Boryspil, the city’s international airport.

All main urban regions, port facilities, and industrial centers in Ukraine are connected by rail to neighboring countries. The Donbas region of Ukraine has the highest concentration of railway track. Despite the fact that rail freight transport declined in the 1990s, Ukraine remains one of the world’s top rail users.

Ukraine’s overall railroad track length is 22,473 kilometers (13,964 miles), with 9,250 kilometers (5,750 miles) electrified in the 2000s. The state holds a monopoly on passenger rail transport, and its business ‘Ukrzaliznytsia’ operates all trains, with the exception of those operated with the collaboration of other foreign enterprises on international lines.

Ukraine’s largest international airport is Kyiv Boryspil. It has three main passenger terminals and is home to Ukraine International Airlines, the country’s flag carrier. Other major airports in Ukraine include those in Kharkiv, Lviv, and Donetsk (now demolished), as well as those in Dnipro and Odessa, which are undergoing terminal expansions.

Ukraine has a number of airlines, including Windrose Airlines, Dniproavia, Azur Air Ukraine, and AtlasGlobal Ukraine, in addition to its flag carrier. The An-225 is the world’s largest fixed-wing aircraft, and Antonov Airlines, a subsidiary of the Antonov Aerospace Design Bureau, is the only operator.

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International marine transport is mostly offered through the Port of Odessa, from which ferries to Istanbul, Varna, and Haifa depart on a regular basis. Ukrferry is the largest ferry operator currently running these routes. According to the World Tourism Organization, Ukraine ranked 8th in Europe for the number of tourists arriving in 2007.

There are many tourist attractions in Ukraine, including mountain ranges suitable for skiing, hiking, and fishing; the Black Sea coastline as a popular summer destination; nature reserves of various ecosystems; churches, castle ruins, and other architectural and park landmarks; and a variety of outdoor activity points. Kyiv, Lviv, Odessa, and Kamyanets-Podilskyi are the main tourist destinations in Ukraine, each with a wealth of historical treasures and a robust hospitality infrastructure.

Tourism used to be the mainstay of Crimea’s economy, but since Russia’s annexation in 2014, tourist numbers have plummeted. The Seven Wonders of Ukraine and the Seven Natural Wonders of Ukraine are a selection of Ukraine’s most notable sites chosen by the general people via an Internet vote.

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How To Reach Ukraine

If you think Ukraine and Russia are the same, you’re in for a rude awakening. Here’s the news: it is not. Yes, Ukraine shares some borders and history with the Soviet Union and Russia, but it has always stood on its own in terms of culture, habits, language, and religion since the dawn of time.

Ukraine is an East European country known for its Black Sea beaches, churches, old cathedrals, monasteries, and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster. What is the best way to get to Ukraine? Here’s how to do it.

1. By Air

Borispol International Airport, located in Kiev, Ukraine’s capital city, is the country’s most major international airport. Air Ukraine and Ukraine International Airlines are the two primary national carriers in the country.

There are a few other international airports in cities such as Odessa and Lviv, all of which are well connected to European cities such as London, Frankfurt, Brussels, Berlin, Rome, Istanbul, and Barcelona. Stopover flights from India are available from Mumbai and Delhi on a regular basis, or you can fly to any of the above-mentioned European cities and connect to Kiev or Lviv.

2. By Rail

There are excellent rail connections between Ukrainian cities and important European tourist sites such as Warsaw, Berlin, Budapest, and Moscow. The principal hubs for these trains are Kiev and Lviv. There are no direct trains from much of Western Europe; instead, passengers must change trains in Berlin, Germany.

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3. By Road

Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, Russia, and Belarus all have land borders with Ukraine. As a result, anyone from any of these countries can drive into Ukraine. Buses run frequently between major Ukrainian cities such as Kiev, Lviv, and Odessa, and are one of the best routes to enter the country by road. If you wish to prioritize comfort over cost, you can hire a personal car.

4. By Sea

Due to Ukraine’s proximity to the Black Sea, significant mail and cargo transportation by water occurs on a regular basis between Turkey, Russia, Georgia, and Ukraine. Some cruises from the Mediterranean stop in Ukrainian ports, so you can travel to Ukraine by sea from places like Piraeus, Haifa, Port Said, Istanbul, Surmene, and Batumi (Georgia).

5. Getting Around

Ukraine is not the best country in which to travel by road between cities. The highways are bumpy, and there aren’t many sight stations to be found. Even yet, there are vehicle rental agencies and hotels along highways if you want to stay the night. Taking aircraft or trains, as well as a ferry or cruise between ports like Kiev, Odessa, and Sevastopol, is considerably more convenient.

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Best Time To Visit In Ukraine

Ukraine is a landlocked country in Eastern Central Europe with a continental climate. The country features a varied flora and fauna, as well as a varied landscape including beaches, hills, steppes, lakes, and rivers. If you’re planning a visit to Ukraine, make sure you travel when the weather is nice. Here’s a guide on the best time to visit Ukraine to assist you.

1. The season of spring (March to May)

In Ukraine, the melting of winter snow signals the start of spring, which is typically marked by swollen streams and flooded rivers. In March and April, flash floods are widespread, but May is one of the best months to visit Ukraine for a spring vacation. The night frost has mostly vanished, the winds have died down, and the average temperature has risen to roughly 15-21°C.

2. The Summer (June to August)

Summer in Ukraine is really hot. Summers are the best time to visit the country, with maximum temperatures reaching 30°C. The beaches warm up, the seas become perfect with their subtropical winds, and the number of sunny brilliant days increases.

Summer in Ukraine is a time of harvest and many local celebrations, as it is also an agrarian country. From May through mid-September, most resort towns, tourist attractions, and beaches are fully booked.

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3. Autumn (September to November)

The autumn season has here. Ukraine is hot and rainy most of the year, but around the end of September, the country experiences a heat wave that makes everything feel like a “Indian summer.”

By the end of October, the temperature had dropped to an average of 10°C, and it has continued to fall as time passes. Birds move south, and everyone slows down to prepare for the coming winter. So, unless you don’t mind dramatic weather fluctuations and rainy days, autumn may not be the best time to visit.

4. The season of winter (December to February)

Winter in Ukraine, like in Russia, is bitter, cold, and harsh, and it is not for the faint of heart. On some days, the temperature may drop below -30°C, and it may rain or snow.

December and January are likely to be the coldest months of the year. If you dislike winters and snow, this is not the best time to visit Ukraine because all outdoor activities are closed. Ski and mountain resorts that open for Christmas and New Year’s are the only saving grace.

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Ukraine’s Best Tourist Attractions

Ukraine, being Europe’s largest country, has a plethora of tourist attractions, including festivals honoring the country’s rich culture and a beautiful collection of centuries-old buildings. Ukraine’s people are as diverse as its landscape, from rolling countryside to cobblestone alleyways of old city centers, and they are among Europe’s most welcoming people.

The word “Ukraina” literally means “borderland,” and the country has long been a favorite target for invasions. The land has been shared by Russia, Poland, Austria, the Czech Republic, and Romania at various times.

Today, you’ll find an undiscovered Eastern European treasure searching for its own identity and carving a distinct niche in the tourism world. When you visit, make an effort to strike up a conversation with a local at one of the many delicious eateries or marketplaces. Recipes from the past are being reimagined with a modern twist.

Everyone wants to improve their English, so take advantage of the opportunity to learn about the best of what Ukraine has to offer from a native. See our list of top sites and things to do in Ukraine for sightseeing ideas.

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1. Chernobyl

Ukraine Government seeks UNESCO 'World Heritage Site' tag for Chernobyl |  Deccan Herald

Do you know what the term “Dark Tourism” means? It refers to visits to locations associated with death or tragic events. Popular examples are the 9/11 Memorial at Ground Zero in New York City, Alcatraz in San Francisco, Pearl Harbor, Pompeii, and the Cambodian Killing Fields. Visitors to Ukraine should include the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, which was the epicenter of the accident.

The 1989 explosion occurred at the town of Pripyat, which is located in Northern Ukraine. The site has recently reopened to the public, but only with the permission of an approved tour company. If you’re concerned about radiation, studies show that a transatlantic trip exposes passengers to more radiation than a Chernobyl visit.

A Chernobyl Tour is a simple, full-day journey from Kiev, located about 65 miles away. Visitors can be picked up from their hotel and dropped off after the tour. During the ride, you will be shown an educational documentary on the disaster. The incident is brought to life through narration and genuine film, which prepares visitors for what is to come.

The tour takes visitors through a variety of structures, some of which resemble a theatrical set. It’s a very touching event that will linger long after you’ve left.

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2. St. Sophia’s Cathedral

Saint Sophia Cathedral, Kyiv - World History Encyclopedia

Since the 1980s, St. Sophia’s Cathedral (also known as Saint Sophia Cathedral) has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This church stands out among the other ancient structures with its ornate Baroque facade, which features 13 golden domes. Its allure entices you into an awe-inspiring interior.

Inside, you’ll find stunning murals, historic mosaics, and centuries-old frescoes. To get the full experience, take a tour or attend a service. Since its erection in 1037, St. Sophia’s, named after Hagia Sophia, has been one of Kiev’s most well-known landmarks. The bell tower offers one of the best views in Kiev, and it’s well worth the climb to the top!

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3. Visit L’viv’s Historic Center, a UNESCO World Heritage Site

14 Top-Rated Attractions & Things to Do in Ukraine | PlanetWare

The city of L’viv is one of the most lovely and well-preserved Ukrainian tourist sites. The old center has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and tourists will enjoy strolling around the cobblestone lanes and taking in the sights.

The old city, known as “the Paris of Ukraine,” has a very classic European feel to it, with modern comforts and outstanding restaurants. The café scene is hard to beat for coffee enthusiasts. This is a place where caffeine in all forms is taken very seriously.

Climb the bell tower’s 1,000-plus stairs for a bird’s-eye perspective of the town. The landscape is beautiful in every way.

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4. Eat Borscht

Borscht - Wikipedia

With the recent explosion in gourmet tourism, many people feel there is no better way to immerse themselves in a new culture than via their food. Borscht is a traditional Ukrainian dish that can be found in restaurants around the country. It’s a perfect example of citizens extending ingredients during hot times, and if you’re lucky, the best versions will inspire you to find a recipe to make when you get home.

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5. Visit a trip to a sunflower farm

Sun flowers field in Ukraine Stock Photo by ©bloodua 81288918

Sunflower oil is one of Ukraine’s most important exports; in fact, the country is the world’s second largest producer of the oil. Throughout the country, tourists will find vast fields of flowers.

These platter-size flowers, which come in a variety of colors ranging from buttercup to golden orange, flourish in the area’s soil and environment. Make sure to keep close to the field’s edge when setting up the perfect place for your Instagram snap. The flowers are massive, and those who get carried away and find off may quickly become lost in a sea of yellow and green.

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